Sign in with your NHL account:
  • Submit
  • Or
  • Sign in with Google
Detroit Red Wings DetroitRedWings.com presented by AT&T
Stay Connected to the Detroit Red Wings
Email Updates App Text/SMS Updates Twitter Facebook Red Wings TV RSS Feeds
Red Wings Blog

POSTED ON Monday, 05.21.2012 / 12:26 PM
By Bill Roose - Managing Editor | DetroitRedWings.com / The Wheel Deal

In order to view this page you need JavaScript and Flash Player 9+ support!
The minute that it was suggested, New York Mets manager Terry Collins knew exactly which NHL sweater he was pulling off the rack in Midtown Manhattan.

“Growing up in Michigan, I’ve always been a Red Wings’ fan,” said Collins, in his second season as the Mets skipper.

The Mets have planned a series of themed road trips this summer. Meant as team-bonding exercises, the Mets began with Western outfits last month in Houston. The exercises are similar to what the Tampa Bay Rays have done in recent years with their Johnny Cash inspired all-black trip and their pajama party plane parade.

Someone on the Mets came up with the idea of wearing NHL jerseys on the team’s interleague road trip to Toronto last weekend.

Collins, who was a three-sport prep star at Midland High School in the mid-60s, wore a Red Wings home jersey with Pavel Datsyuk’s No. 13 on the back. The Michigan native, who also managed the Houston Astros and California Angels during his career, wasn’t alone in his Winged Wheel choice as two other members of the Mets’ entourage, pitchers Tim Byrdak and Robert Carson, also donned Wings sweaters for the trip.
 
“We’ve got a lot of hockey fans on our club,” Collins said. “In spring training we talked about taking themed road trips and one of the guys said, ‘Hey, let’s take a hockey trip when we go to Canada.’ So I told all of the players that they could pick a team and we went to the NHL Store and got the jerseys.”

Many of the 30 NHL teams were represented by the Mets’ players and staff as they got off the team’s bus in front of The Ritz-Carlton in Toronto. But some players chose to go off the grid, like Canadian-born outfielder Jason Bay who went old school with a Hartford Whalers jersey while relief pitcher Jon Rauch went Hollywood in a Syracuse Bulldogs sweater made famous in the classic hockey movie “Slapshot”.

A couple teams still alive in the STanley Cup playoffs were represented as well with relief pitcher Manny Acosta going with a New York Rangers jersey and catcher Mike Nickeas, who’s one of two Canadians on the big league roster, picking a Los Angeles Kings sweater. All-Star pitcher Johan Santana wore a Minnesota Wild sweater, which isn’t that strange considering that he got his big league career started with the Twins in 2000.

Always a Wings' fan, Collins forged that fanaticism as a student-athlete at Eastern Michigan University where he led the Hurons to the NAIA baseball national championship in 1970. Back then it wasn’t unusual for Collins and his buddies to make the 70-mile round trip to Olympia Stadium several times a season to watch his favorite players, including Gordie Howe.

“I went to a ton of games,” Collins said. “Sid Abel, Ned Harkness and Alex Delvecchio put together some pretty good teams.”

Then there was the unforgettable night when Collins attended a home game against the Montreal Canadiens.

“I remember being surprised by just how big he was,” said Collins, of meeting Howe after the game. “It was a long time ago, almost 40 years. He was an all-time great and he took time out to talk to me. He was 'the guy' and it was an experience I'll never forget.”

So then why a Datsyuk jersey on the Toronto trip?

“I wanted one with a name on the back and (Datsyuk’s) was available,” said Collins, who will turn 63 this Sunday. “They have a lot of great stars. I enjoy watching them play.”

Follow Bill Roose on Twitter | @Bill_Roose



|
|
|
POSTED ON Thursday, 04.26.2012 / 3:52 PM
By Bill Roose - Managing Editor | DetroitRedWings.com / The Wheel Deal

Red Wings forward Justin Abdelkader reads the oath of re-enlistment to Chief Petty Officer Aron Mazurek, of the U.S. Navy on Thursday. (Photo by Dan Mannes/Detroit Red Wings)
Regardless of where he's been in the world, nothing has kept U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer Aron Mazurek away from the team that he has idolized since boyhood.

That’s what made Thursday’s re-enlistment ceremony at Joe Louis Arena so special for the Warren, Mich., native, who graduated from Lincoln High School in 1998.

Standing on a red carpet and about the precise spot on the ice where Karen Newman sings the National Anthem prior to each home game, Mazurek’s swearing in ceremony was officiated by Wings forward Justin Abdelkader.

“This was amazing as I’ve been a lifelong Red Wings’ fan having grown up down the street,” said Muzurek, 32. “I used to come to a lot of the games and I’ve watched them in Spain, from Africa, and off the coast of Iraq on a ship.”

Abdelkader, who grew-up in Muskegon, Mich., and flew with the U.S. Navy’s Blue Angels last July was delighted to administer the oath of re-enlistment to CPO Mazurek.

Abdelkader and goalie Jimmy Howard are set to leave this Saturday for Finland where they will represent Team USA at the 2012 IIHF World Championship. 

“My enlistment contract was up and I reenlisted for six more years in the Navy,” said Mazurek, who enlisted 14 years ago. “The world travel is my favorite and the stability that it provides in a struggling economy and the training on the most high-tech equipment that you can think of. It’s amazing.”

Mazurek and his family will remain in Michigan until mid-November when they will move to Virginia Beach, Va.
 
Follow Bill Roose on Twitter | @Bill_Roose



|
|
|
POSTED ON Wednesday, 04.25.2012 / 3:29 PM
By Bill Roose - Managing Editor | DetroitRedWings.com / The Wheel Deal

Wings defenseman Brad Stuart played around with his sons, Jake and Logan, at the Pepsi Center in Denver before a practice in early December. (Photo by Bill Roose/Detroit Red Wings)
As a father of two young kids, I can’t imagine what it would be like to be away from my family for eight months out of the year.

Actually, I wouldn’t want to know.

But professional athletes are different. They’re often forced to make life-changing choices, which some times means leaving family behind in the pursuit of a dream. It’s a business decision that Red Wings defenseman Brad Stuart and his family made four years ago. But now that his contract is drawing to an end, it appears that more important things may take precedence over hockey.

As the Wings cleaned out their locker room at Joe Louis Arena on Tuesday, Stuart spoke candidly about the last four years in Detroit, his teammates, the organization, his hockey future, and his desire to be closer to his family, including two young sons, Jake and Logan.

Since the Wings acquired Stuart in a trade from Los Angeles late in the 2007-08 season he has regularly made trips home to San Jose, Calif., even if that meant seeing his wife Melissa, the boys, and his teenage step-daughter for only a day before rejoining the team.
 
It’s been tough on Stuart, but tougher to see tears well in the boys’ eyes as they beg dad not to leave.

“There were times if we had a Sunday off and didn't play again until Wednesday, they'd let me take Sunday and Monday off so I'd go home Sunday, come back Monday night, miss a practice,” Stuart said. “Now flying in for a day is some times worse than not coming at all because they get all emotional. I made it through the last few years. It'll be a decision we have to make whether we can do it again.”

The decision that Stuart must make is whether to enter free agency on July 1 – and hope to land a deal with a California-based team like the Kings or Sharks – or negotiate a deal with Wings general manager Ken Holland.

“It’s not as easy as just picking and choosing where you want to go,” Stuart said. “I guess the decision I'll have to make is am I going to go to free agency? I haven't talked to Kenny yet so I guess I’ll have to talk to him a little bit about it.”

During his time with the Wings, which includes winning the Stanley Cup in 2008, Stuart has been a steady contributor on the blue line and an exceptional defender on the penalty kill. Partners with Niklas Kronwall for much of his time, there’s no doubt that Stuart will be missed.

But who can blame a man for wanting to be with his family?

“Family comes first. That's just the way it has to be,” Kronwall said. “He'll talk it over with his family, see how they feel. Everyone knows his family has been in California for a few years and it's got to be tough on him. His kids are growing up, and as much as I hate to see him leave, he needs to do what’s right for him and his family.”

The wounds of missing his family wound re-open every time his teammates brought their kids to The Joe to skate before and after practices. Stuart is as low-key of a person that you’ll ever meet, but whenever asked about his family you could see the hurt in his face and hear the tremble in his voice.

Stuart’s step-daughter has one more year of high school, and while his sons are only four- and five-years-old hockey has kept their dad away for half of their young lives.

“Those are all factors I have to consider,” Stuart said. “My boys are getting older now. … It's getting harder to be away from them. I don't enjoy being away from my kids or my wife.”

And no dad wants to see crocodile tears.

“Yeah, if it was a purely hockey decision, I would stay,” Stuart said. “But I've got other things to consider and other factors other than just hockey. Those are things I guess I'll have to figure out in the next month and a half.”

Follow Bill Roose on Twitter | @Bill_Roose

|
|
|
POSTED ON Thursday, 04.19.2012 / 4:19 PM
By Bill Roose - Managing Editor | DetroitRedWings.com / The Wheel Deal

Friday's Game 5 in Nashville will be playoff game No. 263 for Red Wings defenseman Nicklas Lidstrom. (Photo by Getty Images)
With the Red Wings staring down the barrel of an elimination game Friday in Nashville, captain Nicklas Lidstrom was asked following Thursday’s practice if he’s begun to contemplate the inevitable.

Whether the legendary defenseman – who is assured a place in Hockey’s Hall of Fame – ultimately decides to retire after this season or comes back for a 21st NHL season that decision is far off.

“I don't think like that,” said Lidstrom when asked if these are his final games. “I think I’ve learned from other years I try to push that aside and try to play a real solid game, great game and come out with a win.”

Nine days away from turning 42-years-old, Lidstrom is also four games shy of catching former defensive partner Chris Chelios for the most all-time playoff games played in NHL history. Lidstrom has collected 54 goals and 129 assists in 262 playoff games.

In that time, he’s only missed two playoff games, both during the 2009 Western Conference finals after Chicago’s Patrick Sharp accidentally speared him, causing a groin injury that required surgery and forced Lidstrom to miss the final two games of the series.

In February a deep ankle bruise forced him to miss 11 games, which has brought into question the defenseman’s durability, if not his desire to return after this season, which he quickly dismissed.

“It won't be a factor. My health is good,” Lidstrom said. “That's something I'll look back at once the season is over. Once the summer comes, you start thinking about the future. That comes into your thought process again.”

Lidstrom leads all Wings’ skaters with 24:02 of ice-time in the playoffs, despite being the team’s only defensemen not to log anytime on the penalty kill. But that’s purposely done to prevent further injury if he were to block a shot with his right ankle.

Mike Babcock has heard the same stories tying the lingering injury to Lidstrom’s future, but the Wings’ coach isn’t interested in worry about that right now.

“The way I look at it is we have to win a game, so that’s our approach,” Babcock said. “I haven’t thought much about Nick. When Nick decides to retire I’m sure it will be his wife and then his kids, then I think the community, I don’t know, then after that I’ll hear it on the news somewhere. Who knows. I’d be shock if he retires, but I’ve been shocked before.”

Lidstrom’s teammates haven’t given much consideration to life without Lidstrom, either.

“It's crossed my mind,” admitted goalie Jimmy Howard. “You try not to think about it. It's been quite an honor to play with Nick and I hope he comes back.”

Follow Bill Roose on Twitter | @Bill_Roose

|
|
|
POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.17.2012 / 5:25 PM
By Bill Roose - Managing Editor | DetroitRedWings.com / The Wheel Deal

Swedish DJ Tim Bergling, who is knock professionally as Avicii, released the hit song "Level" in 2011. His song is often played during pre-game warmups at JLA. (Courtesy of Avicii.com)
Remember the scene from the movie “Slap Shot” when Paul Newman’s character Reg Dunlop races up the stairs and accosts the arena organist for playing “Lady of Spain”?

Clearly, that would never occur with any of the current Red Wings, right? Especially since the playlist is selected by one of their own.

Besides practices, team meetings, off-ice workouts, and receiving treatment for a bothersome knee, veteran forward Danny Cleary – as the team’s self-appointed Music Man – still manages to pick the songs played in the arena before and during games.

“We like to have good warm-up music, for sure. Some guys don’t even hear the music. I’m not one of those guys,” Cleary said. “I like how music fires you up and gets you going, and not only in warm-ups, but before the game and in timeouts and breaks. In Detroit we like the certain music that we play and at certain points in the game. I just love it.”

Ayron Sequeira and T Campbell, the DJ for the last 18 seasons at The Joe, are in charge of the in-arena entertainment during Wings’ home games. And getting Cleary’s input is just one aspect of their preparations.

“Dan is very specific and I actually appreciate that because it’s easy when somebody tells you what they like and what they want to hear,” said Sequeira, in her fourth season as executive producer of event entertainment for the NHL club.

A music aficionado with an eclectic taste, Cleary likes everything from alternative rock to hip-hop and techno, whether it’s Linkin Park, Foo Fighters, Riahanna, Jay Z, Avicii, Duncan and Outasight.

“He’s all over the place,” Sequeira said.

The entertainment tandem also has specific music picked out for each player after he scores. So who are the easiest and most difficult players to find music for?

“I know that Nicklas Lidstrom likes AC/DC and the Rolling Stones,” Sequeira said. “Pavel Datsyuk wanted some Pitbull then he wanted some other song. He’s changed his goal song the most out of any player and the one that he wants now is Kalinka, which is a Russian folk song.

“But the world is so small right now with music that it’s not terribly difficult to find songs, but there are times when T and I will be look at each other and be like, ‘What the heck is this one?’ ”

Pregame warm-ups are slated to last 15-minutes, which usually allows for 5-6 full-length songs a night. But with Cleary in control, playlist is always subject to change.

“We did one (list) at the beginning of the year and wanted to see how it would go,” Cleary said. “We obviously had a great home record so we would like to keep it going. We always change it for the playoffs and we’ve gone back to some older years, so I told her it’s up to her tonight. So there’s a lot of pressure on her.”
 
Fans at Game 4 can expect to hear the following songs during warm-ups at The Joe:

“Levels” by Avicii
“Infinity” by Guru Josh Project
“We Found Love” by Riahanna
“Good Feeling” by Flo Rida
“Tonight is the Night” by Outasight
“Light up the Sky” by Duncan

Follow Bill Roose on Twitter | @Bill_Roose


|
|
|
POSTED ON Saturday, 04.14.2012 / 7:46 PM
By Bill Roose - Managing Editor | DetroitRedWings.com / The Wheel Deal

Todd Bertuzzi tangled with Shea Weber early in Game 2, retaliating for the defenseman's treatment of Henrik Zetterberg at the end of Game 1. (Photo by Getty Images)
DETROIT – The Red Wings have led the league with the fewest fighting majors in each season since the NHL lockout, which isn’t much of a surprise since the team was assembled for speed and puck-possession, not fisticuffs.

But emotions are heightened in the Stanley Cup playoffs, and before Friday’s Game 2 in Nashville, the Wings had 10 fights in the last 12 postseason series.

“We're built different than lots of teams,” admitted coach Mike Babcock, who was asked if he expected his team to retaliate against Shea Weber for Wednesday’s end-of-game incident when the Predators’ captain grabbed Henrik Zetterberg by the back of the helmet and slammed him face-first into the glass.

Weber’s actions also left Zetterberg’s helmet cracked in two places.

While fighting isn’t necessarily a characteristic of the Detroit organization, Todd Bertuzzi wasn’t going to stand idly by and allow Weber to get away with his reckless indiscretion. On his first shift, Bertuzzi dished out some of his own hockey justice, zeroing in on Weber at the start of Friday’s game at Bridgestone Arena.  

“I think it's an important part of hockey, standing up,” Babcock said. “I just thought that the incident the other night wasn't part of hockey. I haven't seen it since junior hockey. I thought it was unacceptable and I think sometimes when things don't get looked after (by the league) you have to look after it yourself. And I didn't think things were looked after at all.”

Weber received a roughing minor at the end of Wednesday’s series opener, which the Predators won, 3-2. He also received a $2,500 fine, which the league said, is the maximum allowed under the Collective Bargaining Agreement.

Clearly not wanting to discuss his role as Wings’ sheriff, Bertuzzi summed up his actions as “Something you gotta do. You have to stick-up for your teammates and do stuff like that.”

However, the fight seemed to give the Wings a spark, as they built a 2-0 lead before the first intermission, and Zetterberg said it sent a message.

“It was nice of Bert going out,” he said. “It was a good start to the game, the crowd got going, we got going. You get fired up. You get a little momentum. It’s easier for us to get going.”

Now the series is tied and the table it set for Game 3, which is Sunday at Detroit’s Joe Louis Arena, but Wings captain Nicklas Lidstrom doesn’t expect any carryover.

 “I think it was taken care of early on and we showed that we didn't accept that and moved on from there,” Lidstrom said. “Bert took care of it on the first shift and we just went out and won a game last night.”

Follow Bill Roose on Twitter | @Bill_Roose

|
|
|
POSTED ON Tuesday, 04.10.2012 / 10:58 AM
By Bill Roose - Managing Editor | DetroitRedWings.com / The Wheel Deal

Danny Cleary has battled through the pain of a sore left knee for much of the second half of the season. Now he's set to play through the pain in the playoffs. (Photo by Getty Images)
As the majority of the Red Wings’ walking wounded have returned to the lineup over the last few weeks and are getting back into “game shape” – as they like to call it – there is one guy who has come to the realization that pain is something he’ll have to deal with for as long as the 2012 Stanley Cup playoffs last.

For the last several months now, forward Danny Cleary has tolerated the physical discomfort of two Baker’s cysts behind his left knee.

“Nothing I can really do,” said Cleary, who has had several procedures to drain fluid from the cysts. “The rest helps a lot to bring down the swelling, but once you get back on the ice, it's pretty sore.”

Without Cleary and center Darren Helm (sprained left knee) on the third forward line, the Wings are missing two of their most aggressive, grinding forecheckers, along with forward Drew Miller, who has proven to be equally as valuable on the penalty kill. Helm, who missed the final 10 games of the regular-season, is likely out for Wednesday’s series opener at Nashville.

However, Cleary is expected to be in the lineup at Bridgestone Arena.

“I'm going to play for sure,” he said.

Cleary indicated that he will have a pain-killing shot before each game, and that surgery is in his future, but not until after the playoffs. He’s also three Synvisc injections that doctors said they won't know the results until third week of April before it the medication fully sets in.

“I've got bone-on-bone rubbing, which is causing a lot of swelling, a lot of fluid, that's why I get the Baker's cysts in the back that get drained every 10 days,” Cleary said. “There's a few things going on.”

But so how effective he can be on one healthy knee is anybody’s guess.

“It's another level, that's for sure,” said Cleary, who estimates that he’s at 50 percent. “Mentally, I'm, just going to have to find a way to get through it, do the best I can, contribute and try to be a factor.

“It's hard to gauge, until you get going in a playoff series. A lot of people play with different things, injuries. Sometimes the situation can alleviate a little bit of pain. Pain medication will help a lot.”

Follow Bill Roose on Twitter | @Bill_Roose

|
|
|
POSTED ON Saturday, 04.07.2012 / 4:58 PM
By Bill Roose - Managing Editor | DetroitRedWings.com / The Wheel Deal

More than 700 hockey fans made their way from Quebec City to cheer for the Red Wings Saturday and to lobby for an NHL franchise. (Photo by Dave Reginek)
If the objective was to be seen – and heard – the large group clad in blue T-shirts and jerseys adorned with fleur-de-lis emblems, sure got their message across to the nationally televised audience at a sold-out Joe Louis Arena on Saturday afternoon.

More than 700 fans of the former Nordiques organization made the exhausting 725-mile road trip from Quebec on 14 busses to attend the Red Wings season finale – a 3-2 shootout loss to the Chicago Blackhawks.

Genevieve Malenfant, of Quebec City, said the group known as Nordiques Nation, wants the NHL to return to the capital city, which is the second most populated city in Quebec after Montreal.

“I’m here for my Wings, of course,” said Malenfant, decked out in Red Wings’ gear. “But we are here because we want to have our team, the Nordiques, like we did 17 years ago. We want to have our hockey team back in Quebec.”

According to Richard Levesque, who attended Saturday’s game with his son, Detroit was the fifth and final NHL city on the group’s North American tour this season, having also visited Newark, Miami, Ottawa and Boston.

“We like for the Red Wings Detroit to win the game,” said Levesque, in a thick French accent, “but we’re having some fun.”

The Nordiques are the only major professional sports team to have been based in Quebec City, calling it home from 1972 when they started out in the World Hockey Association. In 1995, the Nordiques were granted membership into the NHL, however, financial troubles made it difficult for them to complete in a new age of rising player salaries, and they moved to the United States where they became the Colorado Avalanche.

Many members of the boisterous group said that they believe the Nordiques will return soon, and in the form of the Phoenix Coyotes, who’ve been owned by the NHL since 2009.

“For myself, I would say next year, but for the majority of the people here, even my boyfriend, they’ll say in these coming few months. But for sure I’ll say next year because they’re building a big arena and it will be ready in two years in 2015.”

Follow Bill Roose on Twitter | @Bill_Roose


|
|
|
POSTED ON Friday, 04.06.2012 / 3:56 PM
By Bill Roose - Managing Editor | DetroitRedWings.com / The Wheel Deal

As a high school freshman, Patrick Kane attended Detroit Country Day for the 2003-04 school year. (Photo by Getty Images)
Comedian Robin Williams and CNN host Sr. Sanjay Gupta are a few of the prominent former high school students to pass through the prestigious halls of Detroit Country Day in suburban Oakland County.

And while politicians, actors, business executives and other athletes, like NBA stars Shane Battier, Chris Webber and JaVale McGee round-out the laundry list of Yellowjackets alums, NHL players aren’t in abundance at the century-old private school. In fact, there’s just one such player, Chicago Blackhawks center Patrick Kane, who attended the campus in Bloomfield Township.

A hockey prodigy as a young child in Buffalo, New York, Kane moved to suburban Detroit where he played for Detroit HoneyBaked. He was just 14-years-old when he was invited to live with former NHL star Pat Verbeek and his family.

It was a complete culture change for Kane, who quickly needed to assimilate to the Country Day rules and environment.

“That school is unbelievable,” he said. “Obviously one of the nicest high schools that I’ve ever been to, but really professional, classy and the only school that I had to show up to wearing nice slacks, a nice shirt and tie and the Country Day sport coat. That was a little different, but it was fun, I really enjoyed it.”

Country Day students must compete on two athletic teams each year, however, because he played junior hockey, Kane was exempt.

“I wanted to play basketball but it just didn’t work out with my schedule,” he said. “I actually tried out for the team and made the JV team but it didn’t work out to where I could play. It was the same with some of the other sports, because I would have liked to play lacrosse, but it didn’t work out.”

A year later, Kane was invited to join the U.S. National Team Development program in Ann Arbor. He transferred to Huron High School and became a University of Michigan football fan.

“It was different, more traditional, a public high school with a lot of different ethnicities,” Kane said, “but it was cool from a learning experience because I hung out with some new friends, it was a different experience but after a couple of weeks you feel comfortable anywhere.”

But raised on Buffalo sports teams like the Sabres and Bills, Kane was astonished with his first glimpse into of Michigan Stadium, nicknamed the ‘Big House’ which seats 115,000 college football fans on crisp fall Saturday afternoons.

“Oh yeah, I went to one or two (games) pretty much every year that I was there,” Kane said of Wolverines football. “My billet family had a couple of season tickets, so those were fun games to see how big that place really is. I don’t remember who they played in the first game that I went to, but I remember they blew them out. I went to an Iowa game that was pretty interesting, a really good game. And of course you want to go to the Ohio State game but I missed that one.”

Another don’t-miss game, Kane said, will be on New Year’s Eve when the Big House is turned into the world’s largest hockey stage ever built when the Wings will host the Toronto Maple Leafs in the 2012 Winter Classic.

“I know that it’s going to be really exciting for those teams with 115,000 people that you’re playing in front of when usually we’re playing in front of 18,000 to 22,000 every night,” Kane said. “That seems like a lot for us some nights and we’re entertaining a lot of people. Now you quadruple that, that’s pretty amazing and that’s definitely a game that you would want to be playing in.”

Follow Bill Roose on Twitter | @Bill_Roose



|
|
|
POSTED ON Thursday, 04.05.2012 / 12:36 PM
By Bill Roose - Managing Editor | DetroitRedWings.com / The Wheel Deal

Darren Helm was back on the ice Thursday for the first time since suffering a knee injury in San Jose on March 17. (Photo by Bill Roose/Detroit Red Wings)
It came as a surprise to Darren Helm, but he was happy to learn that his rehabilitation for his strained left knee was ready to take the next step.

“Before I came in today I wasn’t even sure when I’d be on the ice,” the Red Wings center said. “They wanted me to get on there now, and it felt better than I thought. It’s still a ways a way I think, but it still helps a lot mentally.”

For the first time since his knee-to-knee collision with San Jose’s Dominic Moore at HP Pavilion, Helm was back on the ice Thursday, less than three weeks since the St. Patrick’s Day injury.

The original diagnosis for Helm was 4-6 weeks, which would mean that at the very least he would be sidelined through the first few games of the opening playoff series. So the next few hours will be a big indicator for Helm’s recovery, but if there’s no setback, he could return to the Wings’ lineup sooner than first anticipated.

“Previously they told me probably not Game 1,” Helm said. “So I’m not going to be super angry if it’s not Game 1. Obviously, I want to be back. We have to play it as safe as possible right now. If I re-hurt it, it could be the rest of the year; but at the same time I don’t want to milk it too much. It’s a pretty exciting time and I want to get out there.”

And coach Mike Babcock certain would like for his speedy center back to anchor his aggressive third line.

“We could really use Helmer,” Babcock said. “As everyone knows just in watching us play, we’re not near as good a team without him. We have way less depth, and we don’t come at you near as hard. He can really help our team, and the sooner he’s back the better for us. … It was great to see him out there tooling around.” 

Fitted with a metal brace, Helm skated for nearly an hour without much limitation.

“I think the biggest thing is tomorrow, to see how it feels after this skate,” said Helm, who had nine goals and 17 assists. “If it feels good, we can keep pushing it more each day and I can go out and skate with the team. These last two days I think it made a pretty big jump.”

Follow Bill Roose on Twitter | @Bill_Roose


|
|
|

SCHEDULE

HOME
AWAY
PROMOTIONAL

DetroitRedWings.com is the official Web site of the Detroit Red Wings. Detroit Red Wings and DetroitRedWings.com are trademarks of the Detroit Red Wings. NHL, the NHL Shield and the word mark NHL Winter Classic are registered trademarks and Original Six is a trademark of the National Hockey League. All NHL logos and marks and NHL team logos and marks as well as all other proprietary materials depicted herein are the property of the NHL and the respective NHL teams and may not be reproduced without the prior written consent of NHL Enterprises, L.P. Copyright © 1999-2013 Detroit Red Wings and the National Hockey League. All Rights Reserved.
© NHL 2013. All Rights Reserved.

 
Advertise/SponsorshipsOlympia Entertainment | Code of Conduct | Privacy Policy | AdChoices | Employment | Contact Us | NHL.com Terms of Use | Site Map