Josh Langfeld
Josh Langfeld
Left Wing
NUMBER: 15
HEIGHT: 6' 3"
WEIGHT: 215
SHOOTS: Right
BIRTHDATE: 07/17/1977
BIRTHPLACE: Fridley, MN, USA
DRAFTED: OTT: 1997-66 overall

Josh Langfeld was born July 17, 1977 in Coon Rapids, Minnesota. The third-round choice, 66th overall selection of the Ottawa Senators in the 1997 NHL entry draft, Langfeld is a graduate of the CCHA's Michigan Wolverines.

Prior to attending the University of Michigan, Langfeld was a member of the United States Hockey League's Lincoln Stars where he finished with 52 points (35-17-52) and 100 penalty minutes in 38 games while being named a Second Team USHL All-Star.

In his freshmen year with the Wolverines, Langfeld finished fourth in team scoring with 36 points (19-17-36) in 46 games while scoring the 1998 NCAA championship-clinching goal in overtime against Boston College and earning NCAA All-Tournament Team honours.

Receiving an honorable mention for the CCHA All-Rookie Team in 1997-98, Langfeld went on to play four seasons at Michigan finishing his career with 129 points (65-64-129) in 168 games before joining the Senators organization in 2001-02.

Langfeld spent the majority of his first season of professional hockey with the Senators AHL affiliate in Grand Rapids finishing tied for second in goals (21) and tied for third in points (37) while suiting up for one game with the parent club during the regular season. Over the course of the next three seasons, Langfeld split his time between the Senators and the AHL's Binghamton Senators before being acquired by the San Jose Sharks in September, 2005.

Upon his arrival with the Sharks, the former Wolverine registered eleven points before being acquired by the Boston Bruins just prior to the Olympic break. As a member of the Bruins Langfeld registered only a point in 18 games and in the off-season was signed by the Detroit Red Wings.

As a member of the Detroit Red Wings, Langfeld split the 2006-07 season with the Red Wings and their AHL affiliate in Grand Rapids before signing with the Nashville Predators in the off-season.

Courtesy of the Hockey Hall of Fame